LBJ Express Project Overview

What is the LBJ Express project and how is it different from LBJ prior to 2013?

When LBJ Freeway opened in 1969, it was designed to hold about 180,000 vehicles per day. Traffic counts in 2008 put that number at 270,000 vehicles per day. Based on today’s traffic count, by 2020 demand will increase to 500,000 vehicles per day traveling this roadway.

To accommodate the increased traffic, the total 17-mile LBJ Express project incorporates dramatic improvements to I-635 and I-35E in Dallas County. This innovative project features rebuilt general highway lanes, a continuous frontage road system, and 13.3 miles of TEXpress Lanes.

Drivers have the choice of driving on the same number of main general highway lanes at no cost or opting to pay to drive on the new TEXpress Lanes. Motorists who choose to use TEXpress Lanes can expect a reliable, predictable trip through this frequently-congested corridor.

Who was responsible for building LBJ Express?

The LBJ Express improvements were designed, financed and built by the LBJ Infrastructure Group LLC (LBJIG), which was selected by the Texas Transportation Commission after a rigorous, competitive public bidding process. In addition, LBJIG is responsible for operations and maintenance of the 17-mile LBJ Express, including its frontage roads, bridges and general highway lanes, and 13.3 miles of tolled LBJ TEXpress Lanes.

Is 635 East part of the LBJ Express project?

No. The 635 East project, which consists of HOV lanes on I-635 / LBJ Freeway, is managed by the Texas Department of Transportation. It begins at the eastern boundary of the LBJ Express project, near US 75, and extends to I-30.

*Starting April 27, 2020, initial construction began on the TxDOT 635 East Project. As part of this construction, the 635 HOV/Express Lanes (from US 75 to I-30) will close until the end of the project in late 2024. At that time, they will re-open as Managed Toll (TEXpress) Lanes.

How much has LBJ Infrastructure Group invested in the LBJ Express project?

The LBJ Infrastructure Group provided roughly four-fifths of the total financing for the project, or approximately $2.21 billion of the total $2.7 billion needed. The LBJ Express, including the frontage roads, bridges, general highway lanes and TEXpress Lanes, is anticipated to cost $800 million to operate and maintain during the course of its 52-year lease to LBJ Infrastructure Group under the Comprehensive Development Agreement with the State of Texas. Such operation and maintenance costs is the sole responsibility of the LBJ Infrastructure Group. The innovative public-private partnership enables taxpayers to leverage $490 million in public funds to receive more than four times the value in infrastructure enhancements and traffic relief.

What more can you tell me about the LBJ Infrastructure Group?

In partnership with local communities and the State of Texas, the LBJ Infrastructure Group (LBJIG) is committed to developing and operating the safest, most advanced and reliable roadway for North Texas drivers. LBJIG and its consultants employed more than 2,000 Texans during the construction of the project and have a long-term commitment to the state of Texas. The LBJIG project also integrated more than 100 additional Dallas-Fort Worth and Texas companies and their employees in a variety of capacities. Our goal is to work constructively with all participants such as our neighbors, friends and associates.

How does the LBJ Express project improve safety along the corridor?

The LBJ Express Project has completely rebuilt the frontage roads and general highway lanes to current federal and state highway standards, with wider lanes and shoulders on each side.

In addition, the project has added 13.3 miles of TEXpress Lanes which are separate from the free general highway lanes and utilize their own entrance and exit ramps. Prior to entering each of the three tolling segments on the LBJ TEXpress Lanes, signage provides drivers with advance notice of the pricing for that particular segment.

Are the 635 East Express/HOV Lanes part of the LBJ Express project or the LBJ TEXpress Lanes?

No, the 635 East Express/HOV Lanes, which run from US 75 to I-30, are not part of the LBJ Express project nor are they an extension of the LBJ TEXpress Lanes managed by LBJ Infrastructure Group. The 635 East Express/HOV Lanes are operated and managed by the Texas Department of Transportation.

*Starting April 27, 2020, initial construction began on the TxDOT 635 East Project. As part of this construction, the 635 HOV/Express Lanes (from US 75 to I-30) will close until the end of the project in late 2024. At that time, they will re-open as Managed Toll (TEXpress) Lanes.

LBJ Freeway Capacity

The original design capacity of the LBJ Freeway was 180,000 vehicles a day, what is the capacity of the new design?

According to the Regional Transportation Council 2030 Mobility Plan, the eventual demand for this portion of LBJ is 500,000 vehicles per day by 2020. There is no way the facility can be built to handle this demand. Even upon completion, the roadway would be outdated.

However, in order to account for this massive increase in capacity, traffic must be managed by developing programs controlling the speeds of drivers through the corridor. Thus the reason it is necessary to have TEXpress Lanes to keep traffic moving through the corridor.

LBJ Freeway Ownership

Who owns LBJ Freeway and the corridor?

The State of Texas. Throughout the entire duration of the Comprehensive Development Agreement with LBJ Infrastructure Group LLC (LBJIG), the State of Texas, through TxDOT, will have full ownership of the project. Under the CDA, LBJIG has the right to lease the project for 52 years, not unlike many leases by public entities to private companies.

Project Oversight and Maintenance

Who provides oversight of the LBJ Express Project?

For the full 52 years, the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) will provide oversight of the project along with an independent engineer paid for by both TxDOT and LBJIG to audit every aspect of the project.

TxDOT and the independent engineer ensure all aspects of the project are sound. This includes:

  • Ensuring that traffic is flowing through the project, with special attention to peak travel times.
  • Monitoring toll increases to ensure the developer is assessed the appropriate penalties if the toll lane speeds drop below 50 mph, thereby ensuring that LBJIG is using the price-based-on-congestion tolling model and reporting real-time numbers for audit purposes.

Is the quality of this roadway less than that of a TxDOT maintained road?

One of the many added benefits of a private company operating and maintaining the LBJ Express is the incentive for that company to provide a roadway that drivers really want to use.

LBJ Infrastructure Group LLC (LBJIG) will do its best to ensure the project is well-maintained in accordance with the highest standards.

Contractually, maintenance on the road is required at standards higher than current TxDOT standards. LBJ Express developer LBJIG also has an incentive to maintain this road so drivers will have an enjoyable driving experience.

In addition, LBJIG is also required to hand back the LBJ Express to the State of Texas in a pre-defined state of good repair when the 52-year lease expires in 2061. This means the roadway will be returned to the state in fully operational and valuable condition. (Texas Association of Business; “P3 Roadways; Public-Private Partnerships that Work”)

TEXpress Lanes on the LBJ Express Project

What are TEXpress Lanes and how do they differ from toll roads?

TEXpress Lanes are unique toll lanes that are built within an existing highway. They add additional capacity to the highway to accommodate more traffic. Unlike other toll roads, the price changes based on the congestion in the TEXpress Lanes to maintain a minimum speed of 50 mph at all times.

These TEXpress lanes are new and unlike other toll roads in the Dallas-Fort Worth area. It is your choice to drive in the TEXpress Lanes and pay the tolls or to drive in the adjacent non-tolled general highway lanes.

How do TEXpress Lanes work?

TEXpress Lanes are designated express lanes within highway corridors with prices that fluctuate based on traffic demand to prevent congestion.

Equipment will monitor real-time traffic conditions to periodically adjust the prices throughout the day based upon the average speed and number of drivers who want to use the TEXpress Lanes. Prices may go up or down, depending upon the amount of traffic and the time of day, but customers are notified of the price they will pay prior to entering any segment of the TEXpress lanes.

Prices will be lower during non-peak driving times. The variable pricing aims to ensure a predictable, higher-speed commute. However, if there is an accident travel times cannot be guaranteed.

Are TEXpress Lanes the only 'tollways within highways' with dynamic pricing (prices that fluctuate up and down to ease traffic congestion) in the U.S.?

No. Managed lanes, such as TEXpress Lanes, are already in operation in more than a dozen cities throughout the U.S.
Similar facilities that use dynamic pricing include:

  • 495 Express Lanes on the I-495/Capital Beltway in Washington D.C.
  • I-85 in Atlanta
  • I-10 Katy Managed Lanes in Houston
  • SR-91 Express Lanes in Southern California
  • I-10 Express Lanes and I-110 in Los Angeles
  • I-95 Express in Miami-Ft. Lauderdale
  • I-15 Express Lanes in Salt Lake City, UT

How many new TEXpress Lanes have been built?

Along the most congested parts of I-635, there are two to three new TEXpress Lanes in each direction that run in the middle of the general highway lanes. A portion of the TEXpress Lanes on I-635 are located in the LBJ Canyon, beneath the surface-level general highway lanes. Along I-35E, there are two elevated TEXpress Lanes in each direction that run on the outside of this roadway.

In addition, the project includes a continuous frontage road in both directions of I-635, simplifying access to businesses along the roadway and offering bypass lanes to allow through drivers to avoid traffic lights at several busy cross streets.

Will I have to pay to drive on the LBJ Express project?

No. Drivers may choose between the free general highway lanes or the TEXpress Lanes.

At its widest point, the LBJ Express will include four general highway lanes in each direction, two to three continuous frontage road lanes in each direction, plus two to three TEXpress Lanes in each direction.

Drivers will enjoy the same number of free general highway lanes they currently use on LBJ, but with the benefit of lighter traffic as other drivers opt for the TEXpress Lanes.

What are the TEXpress Lanes tolling segments on the LBJ Express?

There are three tolling segments on the LBJ TEXpress Lanes. Separate charges will appear on your billing statement for each tolling segment you use as part of a single trip.

  • Toll Segment 1 begins at Josey Lane and bypasses the I-35E/635 interchange, then runs south to the I-35/Loop 12 split and north on I-35E up to Valley View Lane.
  • Toll Segment 2 extends from Luna Road to the Dallas North Tollway.
  • Toll Segment 3 stretches from the Dallas North Tollway to Greenville Avenue.

Click here to learn more about pricing and the three tolling segments.

Why are there limited entrances and exits on the LBJ TEXpress Lanes?

Like the other tolled express lanes that comprise the North Texas TEXpress Lanes system, the LBJ TEXpress Lanes were designed for longer-distance commuters who need a safe, reliable and predictable roadway to zip from one end of the project to the other. The LBJ TEXpress Lanes feature 15 entrance ramps and 16 exit ramps along this 13.3-mile stretch of roadway. To view illustrations with detailed directions of each entrance rampclick here. To view illustrations of each exit rampclick here.

Can I access the southbound I-35E TEXpress Lanes from the eastbound I-635 TEXpress Lanes?

No, this configuration does not exist. Drivers traveling on the westbound I-635 TEXpress Lanes can use the I-35E/635 interchange to travel onto the northbound or southbound TEXpress Lanes on I-35E. Click here to view the LBJ TEXpress map.

Can I access the southbound I-35E TEXpress Lanes on from the westbound I-635 TEXpress Lanes?

Yes. Drivers traveling on the westbound I-635 TEXpress Lanes can use the I-35E/635 interchange to travel onto the northbound or southbound TEXpress Lanes on I-35E. Click here to view the LBJ TEXpress map.

How do I access the LBJ TEXpress Lanes from US 75/Central Expressway?

There is no direct connection from US 75/Central Expressway onto the LBJ TEXpress Lanes. Drivers can use the  Coit Road/US 75TEXpress Lanes entrance ramp located on the westbound I-635 general highway lanes to access the westbound LBJ TEXpress Lanes. This right-hand on-ramp is situated west of Hillcrest Road (click here to view entrance ramp map). HOV users, such as carpool drivers and motorcyclists, can use the US 75 HOV Entrance from the southbound US 75 HOV lane to enter directly onto the westbound LBJ TEXpress Lanes lane during morning rush hour. This reversible connection is only open from 6:30 to 9:00 a.m. (click here to view entrance ramp map).

How do I access US 75/Central Expressway from the LBJ TEXpress Lanes?

Currently, there is no direct connection from the LBJ TEXpress Lanes onto US 75/Central Expressway for solo drivers. Drivers traveling eastbound on the LBJ TEXpress Lanes can use the Coit Road/US 75 Exit ramp, which will place them on the eastbound I-635 general highway lanes to access US 75/Central Expressway (click here to view exit ramp map). HOV users, such as carpool drivers and motorcyclists, can use the US 75 HOV Exit on the eastbound LBJ TEXpress Lanes to access the northbound US 75 HOV lane during afternoon rush hour. This reversible connection is only open from 3:00 to 6:30 p.m. (click here to view exit ramp map).

How do I access the LBJ TEXpress Lanes from the Dallas North Tollway (DNT)?

There is no direct connection from the Dallas North Tollway onto the LBJ TEXpress Lanes. A Dallas North Tollway Entrance ramp for the LBJ TEXpress Lanes is located on the westbound I-635 general highway lanes, just past Midway Road. To view an illustration with detailed directions for this ramp, click here.

How do I access the Dallas North Tollway (DNT) from the LBJ TEXpress Lanes?

There is no direct connection from the LBJ TEXpress Lanes onto the Dallas North Tollway. Drivers on the eastbound LBJ TEXpress Lanes can use the Dallas North Tollway Exit, which will place them onto the eastbound I-635 general highway lanes near Midway Road. Drivers can then access the DNT entrance ramp on-I-635. To view an illustration with detailed directions for the Dallas North Tollway Exit ramp, click here.

What is GoCarma? How does it work?

GoCarma is an independent platform managed by NCTCOG, separate from NTTA, TxDOT and Drive On TEXpress. The Regional Transportation Council set a policy to move to more advanced technology to verify HOV status and replace manual enforcement. At least one smartphone in each registered vehicle is required through the GoCarma technology selected to meet the RTC’s policy. 

As GoCarma is a new technology & application, we recommend that you visit the GoCarma Help Center for live chat support, help with technical questions and how to get started with the new GoCarma technology. Additionally, the GoCarma Call Center is available at 469-606-3920, Monday-Friday; 9am – 5pm CT.

How do I qualify for HOV discounts?

Click here for detailed information on HOV Discount Qualifications and Activation

You will qualify for an HOV toll discount on LBJ TEXpress Lanes as long as:

  • You have at least two people in the vehicle, such as a driver and a passenger (motorcycles do not require a passenger).
  • You have a valid TollTag, TxTag or EZ TAG account in good standing (i.e. cannot fall into a negative balance)
  • Your Tag is properly mounted on your vehicle’s windshield—including motorcycles—for our scanners to read them.
  • Your trip is during weekday rush-hour periods, Monday through Friday from 6:30 a.m. to 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. 
  • You use the GoCarma app technology
    • The Regional Transportation Council set a policy to move to more advanced technology to verify HOV status and replace manual enforcement. One smartphone in each registered vehicle is required through the GoCarma technology selected to meet the RTC’s policy.
    • The GoCarma app is an independent platform developed by Carma Technologies Corporation through a contract with the North Central Council of Governments (NCTCOG)

Speed Limit

What is the speed limit on the LBJ TEXpress Lanes?

The speed limit is 75 mph on the I-635 portion of the LBJ TEXpress Lanes. The speed limit on the adjacent general highway lanes of I-635 is 70 mph.

Tolls, Pricing and Financing

How many tolling segments are on the LBJ TEXpress Lanes?

There are three tolling segments on the LBJ TEXpress Lanes. Separate charges will appear on your billing statement for each tolling segment you use as part of a single trip.

  • Toll Segment 1 begins at Josey Lane and bypasses the I-35E/635 interchange, then runs south to the I-35/Loop 12 split and north on I-35E up to Valley View Lane.
  • Toll Segment 2 extends from Luna Road to the Dallas North Tollway.
  • Toll Segment 3 stretches from the Dallas North Tollway to Greenville Avenue.

Click here to learn more about pricing and the three tolling segments.

How much do tolls cost?

During the first six months following completion of construction on Phase 1 of the project, prices on the LBJ TEXpress Lanes were fixed, and did not make use of the real-time price increases and decreases. Rather, our pricing was scheduled higher during peak hours and lower during non-peak hours. This essentially simulated the demand-based tolling policies as we developed final pricing for the real-time, demand-based phase of our operations. After that six-month evaluation period, which occurred in June 2014, new tolling policies were implemented in which the price changes based on a number of factors, including real-time congestion levels in each segment and/or the time of day.

Now that the LBJ TEXpress Lanesare in the dynamic pricing phase, average toll prices may range from 15 cents to 35 cents per mile during lighter traffic, and 45 cents to 90 cents during rush hour.  In the event that the average speed on the LBJ TEXpress Lanes drops below 50 mph and starts to deteriorate, the toll rate will rise in order to maintain an average 50 mph trip in each segment of the corridor.

Applicable prices will depend on:

  • Traffic conditions as they change during the day (for instance, there will be higher toll rates during periods of higher congestion to maintain the 50 mph traffic speed)
  • Shape and size of vehicle
  • Number of passengers in the vehicle. Under the current policy, a minimum of two passengers (including the driver) are considered HOV (motorcycles do not need a passenger) and must meet the requirements for HOV Discount Qualifications and Activation. HOV users must have a windshield transponder (TxTAG, TollTag or EZ TAG) to qualify for the HOV discount.

Click here to visit our Average Pricing page and use the average pricing calculator to determine toll rates for a particular trip.

Can LBJ Infrastructure Group charge any price it wants?

No. Tolling policies are set by the Regional Transportation Council (RTC), a standing committee of the North Central Texas Council of Governments. The managed lanes policy for the TEXpress Lanes currently in use by the RTC can be viewed here: North Texas Council Managed Lanes Policy.

Toll rates vary and are unique to the region where the roadway exists, but they are always capped by state and federal authorities. A clearly defined tolling regulation and toll setting is imperative, given the importance of revenue and traffic forecasting to the development of toll projects. (Texas Association of Business; “P3 Roadways; Public-Private Partnerships that Work”)

LBJ Infrastructure Group (LBJIG) is required to increase the price of the tolls every 5 minutes when traffic reaches a maximum car-per-lane threshold or the speed drops below 50 miles per hour for a 15-minute period. LBJIG is charged a penalty under its Comprehensive Development Agreement with the Texas Department of Transportation for not meeting that performance requirement. Those penalties increase as the speed continues to drop.

As a private company, LBJIG has an interest in: 1) providing TEXpress Lanes that drivers want to use, and 2) providing that convenience at a price that drivers are willing to pay to avoid heavy traffic congestion.

Is there a cap on the tolls?

The Base Toll Rate Cap is 90 cents a mile for every toll segment in each direction. This is adjusted each year by a percentage equal to the previous year’s Consumer Price Index.

Congestion-management pricing for the LBJ TEXpress Lanes was implemented on June 12, 2014, and tolls are now raised or lowered based on traffic demand and to keep traffic moving in accordance with a pre-defined mechanism approved by the Regional Transportation Council (RTC) and TxDOT.

What happens with the tolls when there is an accident?

Accidents are an unfortunate common occurrence on all highways. The operator of LBJ Express and North Tarrant Express always strives to clear an accident as soon as possible, even beyond the contractual requirements of the Texas Department of Transportation. In those accident situations, when there are unusual delays in the non-tolled lanes, the TEXpress Lanes tolls may proactively increase to ensure a continuous flow of traffic. This is done to avoid sudden surges in traffic that could stop the continuous movement at the exits and block the lanes that users are paying for. However, depending on the circumstances and magnitude of the accident, the management team in the Traffic Control Center will assess each situation on a case-by-case basis to determine the safest way to proceed.

Why are my tax dollars going to toll roads?

The Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) receives its funding from taxpayers, through taxes on gasoline and bond money that leverage those gas tax dollars. Over the past few years, gas tax revenue has decreased due to improved fuel efficiency in automobiles and motorists driving less frequently for a variety of reasons. The gas tax rate per gallon has not increased for nearly 20 years and does not fluctuate with the unpredictable price of gas.

The North Central Texas Council of Governments’ Regional Transportation Council (RTC) determines the prioritization and funding of transportation projects in North Texas. In our growing North Texas region, transportation needs are significantly greater than the available gas-tax dollars. Simply put, the sole source of revenue to pay for transportation projects in Texas has decreased, while both the population and need for improved roadways have increased.

In response, RTC developed the region’s managed toll lane policy. The region expects LBJIG to maintain a reliable level of service for motorists traveling at 50 mph. Because having fewer cars on the roadway improves mobility throughout the project corridor, the region also has developed a discount for mass transit and peak period carpoolers as an incentive.

Even with the addition of the new TEXpress Lanes, drivers will continue to have the choice to drive at no cost on the completely rebuilt main lanes and continuous frontage roads.

Private-Public Partnership and Funding

How does the public-private partnership benefit the entire region?

Current state transportation funding cannot keep pace with the escalating demand for new and improved roadways in the rapidly growing North Texas region. The Texas Transportation Institute ranks the Dallas/Fort Worth area as the fourth most congested among large urban areas in the U.S., causing local drivers to burn 106 billion gallons of extra fuel per year and waste countless hours delayed in traffic. Given the state’s limited financial resources for infrastructure and the many projects that must compete for those resources, Texas currently is unable to provide fast-track development of much-needed roadway projects that would relieve congestion, improve safety and air quality, while accommodating further anticipated growth.

The LBJ Infrastructure Group provides new sources of funding for the LBJ Express project, generating jobs and investment in the State of Texas. The public-private funding arrangement for the project combines public funds, federally backed loans, private activity bonds, bank debt and private sector equity to make this long discussed project a reality.

The vision for the LBJ Express project is to deliver a new viable transportation network as quickly as possible to help relieve traffic congestion and improve safety and air quality.

How much did LBJ Infrastructure Group invest in the LBJ Express project?

The LBJ Infrastructure Group provided roughly four-fifths of the total financing for the project, or approximately $2.21 billion of the total $2.7 billion needed for the project. The LBJ Express is anticipated to cost $800 million to operate and maintain during the course of its 52-year lease to LBJ Infrastructure Group under the Comprehensive Development Agreement with the State. Such operation and maintenance costs will be the sole responsibility of the LBJ Infrastructure Group. The innovative public-private partnership enables taxpayers to leverage $490 million in public funds to receive more than four times the value in infrastructure enhancements and traffic relief.

How much would it have cost to build the LBJ Express project without private funding?

To put it in perspective, the total budget for FY 2010-2011 for new construction and maintenance for all roadways in the TxDOT Dallas Division (covering a five-county area in North Texas) was $171 million.

By comparison, the total cost of the LBJ Express project, including maintenance and operations, is $2.7 billion with construction alone estimated at $2.1 billion.

Without private developers, the five-year LBJ Express project would have exceeded the total amount budgeted for all of TxDOT’s North Texas transportation needs and likely would have been delayed for years or never built at all.

Comprehensive Development Agreement

What is a Comprehensive Development Agreement (CDA)?

A Comprehensive Development Agreement (CDA) is a legal agreement between a government agency such as TxDOT and a private developer to build much-needed infrastructure with limited tax dollars. Private investors help pay for the needed roadway improvements in return for long-term agreements to collect tolls or receive payments, and the state retains ownership of the land and improvements.

Other CDA projects in North Texas involve public/private partnerships to accelerate construction through the use of private financing. These projects include the $2.1 billion North Tarrant Express and the $1.02 billion DFW Connector in Tarrant County. Each of these projects utilize tolled managed lanes—called TEXpress Lanes—in addition to the non-tolled general highway lanes.

Financial Viability

How does the success of other transportation projects in which Cintra is involved affect the financial viability of the LBJ Express?

Each transportation project is wholly independent from others, so the financial condition of one project has absolutely no bearing on the financial success and delivery of another. Each project has its own unique developer, contractor, shareholders/investors and stakeholders and is subject to the economic environment in which it is operating.

What assurances are in place to protect the state of Texas, taxpayers and local communities?

There are numerous safeguards built into the partnering agreements that eliminate risk to Texas and ensure that the state, taxpayers and local communities will always be protected as they continue to benefit from the creation of new roadways.

What situations or circumstances could cause the developer of the LBJ Express to default on the project?

Default through the operations phase of a transportation project is an extremely remote possibility. In the event that facility users do not utilize the highway at the expected levels over an extended period of time, there is some financial risk. However, due to our extensive modeling of projected regional growth and traffic patterns on the LBJ Express and its TEXpress Lanes, we have a strong, financially-viable project. Furthermore, even if revenues throughout the 52-year project term were 50 percent below forecasts, the debt would still be repaid and there would be no default.

Hazmat Trucks

Are trucks carrying hazardous materials allowed on LBJ's TEXpress Lanes?

No. Hazmat trucks must use the general highway lanes and frontage lanes only.

Bicycles on the LBJ Express Project

How are bikes accommodated on the LBJ Express Project?

The LBJ Express features a shared bike/car lane incorporated into the far right through-lane on each cross street along the I-635 portion of this project. These lanes are 14 feet wide and constructed in accordance with Federal Highway Administration policies.

DART

Why is an east-west DART line not a part of this project?

DART and TxDOT agreed to leave access points available for DART to build a future rail tunnel under the LBJ Express.

DART and North Central Texas Council of Governments studies have determined that the projected number of riders do not justify a line in the corridor for the next 20 years.

Contacting the LBJ Express Project

How can I share my comments and questions?

Submit your comment or question through the Inquiries and Feedback page of the website.

Comments can also be submitted at any time during the project, either in person, by phone, mail, email, delivery or fax to:

LBJ Infrastructure Group, LLC
4545 LBJ Freeway
Dallas, TX 75244
Phone: (877) LBJ-EXPY (525-3979)
Fax: (972) 239-3512
info@TEXpressLanes.com

What happens to my info when I sign up for your e-updates?

The LBJ Express project does not sell our information to ANY LIST. Nor do we implement advertising in any of our online products and are expressly prohibited from doing so by the state.

LBJ Infrastructure Group LLC or Trinity Infrastructure LLC will not allow advertising (especially political advertising in our online tools).

If you receive e-updates from us that include unsolicited advertisements, they could be add-ons from your Internet provider or another party.

US Toll Roads and Infrastructure Funding

What is the role of tolling?

The federal contribution to the Interstate system has decreased form roughly 90% of the initial construction cost to less than 45% of today’s maintenance cost. With the Highway Trust Fund in precarious shape, the federal share will decline even more in the years ahead.

As a direct user charge, tolling appropriately allocates the cost of future improvements to those who benefit directly. According to a November 2012 Reason Foundation study, the cost of collecting tolls in a mature all-electronic tolling system is equivalent to the cost to collect the gas tax.

(Source: International Bridge, Tunnel and Turnpike Association)

Isn’t a toll just another tax?

No, tolls are voluntary user fees. Drivers can choose to pay tolls or take alternative routes, whereas taxes are mandatory and charged to everyone. Yes, customers of toll facilities also pay taxes, but the taxes are used to fund non-toll roads. Since toll roads are primarily self-financed and do not rely on taxes, the customer is not paying twice for the facility. In fact, without tolls, taxes would be higher.

(Source: International Bridge, Tunnel and Turnpike Association)

Doesn’t the gas tax fund transportation?

The 18.4 cents-per-gallon federal gas tax, which was last raised in 1993 and has since lost more than 50% of its purchasing power, cannot sufficiently fund America’s highway infrastructure.  Since 2008, Congress has transferred  more than $55 billion from the General Fund to keep the Highway Trust Fund solvent. Tolls provide a valuable source of revenue both to build new roads and maintain existing roads.

(Source: International Bridge, Tunnel and Turnpike Association)

How do tolls benefit the average American?

The primary benefits are better, safer roadsless congestion; more predictable trip times; and reduced need for taxes to pay for roads. Tolls provide money today for projects that can be built in the near future and meet demand for decades to come. If it were not for tolls, many of the best roads and bridges in the US might never have been built.

(Source: International Bridge, Tunnel and Turnpike Association)

Some states want to put tolls on interstate highways. Why should we allow tolls on roads that are already paid for?

“Already paid for” misses the point. America’s interstate highway system is aging and will deteriorate over time without substantial new investment. The future cost to rebuild these roads will be much higher than the original cost. Federal and state fuel taxes are already insufficient to maintain the interstates in good repair, much less rebuild them. Tolling is a proven, convenient, fair way to raise revenues to rebuild these highways.

(Source: International Bridge, Tunnel and Turnpike Association)

Aren’t the Interstates already paid for?

Many portions of the Interstate system are now more than 50 years old. As the system ages and the federal government’s financial participation declines, states face huge costs to rebuild the system.

Current federal law still imposes major restrictions on states’ ability to toll existing Interstate facilities. With states now facing the financial obligation of maintaining and repairing 50 year old highways, it’s time to change federal policy and give states the maximum flexibility to use tolling as a dedicated source of transportation revenue. This is an argument for flexibility and options, NOT mandates.

It is a common misconception that the Interstates are “already paid for”. Infrastructure of all kinds needs routine maintenance, upgrading, and eventual replacement. Though it cost $129 billion to construct, it will cost nearly $2.5 trillion over the next 50 years to rebuild the interstate system, largely at state expense. States are desperate for new, sustainable revenues streams to support their highways, especially the Interstate highways. A growing number of states are exploring (or revisiting) the benefits of tolling as part of a toolbox of funding options for renovating and upgrading their roadways.

(Source: International Bridge, Tunnel and Turnpike Association)

What about public opposition to the idea of new tolls?

Revenue-raising measures are never popular, especially in a time of economic stress. The federal fuel tax has not been raised since 1993. However, numerous toll facilities have been approved in the anti-tax environment of recent decades, and opinion polls consistently show that motorists prefer tolls over taxes and support the expansion of toll roads to improve driver options and travel times. In one poll, 84 percent of Americans said tolls should be considered as a primary source of transportation revenue or on a project-by-project basis.

(Source: International Bridge, Tunnel, and Turnpike Association)

Won’t tolls increase consumer prices by driving up the cost of trucking?

The poor state of our roads and bridges is already raising consumer prices through congestionlost time and higher operating costs for trucking companies. The most recent Urban Mobility Report by the Texas Transportation Institute found that highway congestion cost the United States $101 billion in 2010 and will rise to $133 billion by 2015. By increasing the quality of infrastructure and easing congestion, tolls can produce cost savings for truckers and all consumers.

(Source: International Bridge, Tunnel and Turnpike Association)

Is tolling fair to low-income motorists?

Many surveys have shown that drivers of all income levels use tolled facilities and support having the option to use high-quality toll roads. A well-designed pricing plan can be less burdensome to low-income citizens than systems that are based on regressive taxes, such as car registration fees, sales taxes and the gasoline tax.

(Source: International Bridge, Tunnel and Turnpike Association)

How do toll roads compare to non-tolled roads in terms of safety?

Toll roads are generally safer than non-tolled roads due to better maintenancepavement, and technology. Toll operators employ state-of-the-art technology to monitor road conditions and have a financial incentive to keep their roads running as safely and smoothly as possible. The facts bear this out, as toll facilities in the United States have a much lower fatality rate than US roads overall.

(Source: International Bridge, Tunnel and Turnpike Association)

NTE Project Overview

What is the scope of the North Tarrant Express (NTE) project?

This 13.3-mile$2.5 billion project involves the total reconstruction of the I-820 and SH-121/183 (Airport Freeway) corridor in Northeast Tarrant County. Improvements include rebuilt general highway lanes, improvements and expansions to the frontage roads, and the addition of four TEXpress Lanes. In 2014, construction began on I-35W, which is an extension of the NTE project. NTE TEXpress Lanes added to I-35W, from downtown Fort Worth to US 287, will open in two phases beginning in summer 2017. The final phase is slated for a fall 2018 opening.

What are the goals of the NTE project?

The NTE project will provide relief from traffic congestion and bottlenecks along one of the most critical highway corridors in the Dallas-Fort Worth region. These improvements will enhance the safety and reliability of this highway system, while lessening environmental impacts resulting from traffic gridlock.

Who developed the NTE project?

NTE Mobility Partners designed, built and financed the NTE, working in close collaboration with the Texas Department of Transportation and the local communities. The company is also responsible for operating and maintaining the NTE TEXpress Lanes, general highway lanes and frontage road within the the NTE. In addition, NTE Mobility Partners is currently working on the on the project’s expansion on 35W.

NTE Mobility Partners represents a consortium of companies, including Cintra US, a world leader in private-sector development of transportation infrastructure; Meridiam Infrastructure, a global public-private partnership investor/developer of private facilities; the Dallas Police and Fire Pension System, the first U.S. pension fund in the country to invest in the building and maintenance of a major toll road project like NTE; and W.W. Webber LLC, a leading Texas construction company.

Who owns the NTE project?

The State of Texas is the project’s owner. NTE Mobility Partners has entered into a lease agreement with the state to improve and expand the NTE, as well as operate and maintain it according to rigorous standards set by the state. Once the lease ends, TxDOT will resume the operation and maintenance of the roadway.

Is the I-35W corridor part of the North Tarrant Express project?

Yes. The project team is now focused on the reconstruction of I-35W. Construction began in 2013 on the northern segment (north of I-820) and in late 2014 on the southern segment (south of I-820). The I-35W highway corridor—a major north/south route for commuters and regional, interstate and international trade—will feature fully rebuilt main lanes and frontage roads, along with two new TEXpress Lanes in each direction. Phase I, which runs from I-820 north to US 287 and is being built by the Texas Dept. of Transportation, is scheduled for a summer 2017 opening. Phase 2, which runs south of I-820 to downtown Fort Worth, is slated for a fall 2018 opening. NTE Mobility Partners will manage both segments of the I-35W corridor and its TEXpress Lanes.

TEXpress Lanes

What are TEXpress Lanes?

TEXpress Lanes are tolled express lanes built within a highway corridor that use dynamic, congestion-management pricing to provide extra capacity, efficiently handle more traffic volume, and maintain a minimum speed of 50 mph.

How are highways with TEXpress Lanes different than toll roads?

A toll road, like the Chisolm Trail Parkway (CTP) or the President George Bush Turnpike (PGBT), charges a fixed or scheduled rate for the use of the road. Additionally, toll roads do not generally predict travel times or ensure that traffic will keep moving as do the TEXpress Lanes.

TEXpress Lanes are designated express lanes within highway corridors with prices that fluctuate based on supply and demand to prevent congestion.

Equipment monitoring real-time traffic conditions will adjust the prices periodically throughout the day based upon the average speed and number of drivers who want to use the TEXpress Lanes. Prices may go up or down, depending upon the amount of traffic and the time of day, but customers are notified of the price they will pay prior to entering any segment of the TEXpress Lanes.

Prices will be lower during non-peak driving times. The variable pricing ensures you a predictable, higher-speed commute.

Will I have to pay a toll to drive on the North Tarrant Express?

No. You may choose to drive on the reconstructed general highway lanes at no cost or, depending on traffic conditions, your schedule, and your budget, you can choose to take the adjacent tolled TEXpress Lanes.

Where are TEXpress Lanes available?

Currently, TEXpress Lanes are under construction, being planned or open on six major Dallas-Fort Worth corridors in addition to the North Tarrant Express:

  • LBJ Express (I-635 and I-35E/Loop 12) OPEN
  • DFW Connector (SH-114) OPEN
  • I-30 (Tom Landry Freeway) OPEN
  • I-35 OPEN
  • NTE 35W
  • Midtown Express (SH-183, SH-114 and Loop 12/Walton Walker Freeway)

Who can use TEXpress Lanes?

Anyone can use TEXpress Lanes, including local drivers, commuters and out-of-town travelers. Drivers can use any tag from Texas (TxDOT’s TxTag, NTTA’s TollTag, or HCTRA’s EZ TAG) or, alternately, pay by mail for an additional surcharge.

How will I know what the toll price is so that I can decide to use the TEXpress Lanes?

Current prices are clearly displayed on signs in advance of each entrance ramp and toll segment entry point. There are two toll segments on the NTE TEXpress Lanes—each toll segment has a separate price (if you drive both segments for your trip, you will incur two toll charges). You will also see separate prices for pre-registered HOV 2+ users and single occupancy vehicles (with a valid TollTag, TxTag or EZ TAG) on all signs. Single occupancy vehicles without a TollTag, TxTag or EZ TAG pay 50% more than the posted prices. Larger vehicles also pay higher tolls.

Click here for more information on HOV Discount Qualifications and Activation

What is GoCarma? How does it work?

GoCarma is an independent platform managed by NCTCOG, separate from NTTA, TxDOT and Drive On TEXpress. The Regional Transportation Council set a policy to move to more advanced technology to verify HOV status and replace manual enforcement. At least one smartphone in each registered vehicle is required through the GoCarma technology selected to meet the RTC’s policy. 

As GoCarma is a new technology & application, we recommend that you visit the GoCarma Help Center for live chat support, help with technical questions and how to get started with the new GoCarma technology. Additionally, the GoCarma Call Center is available at 469-606-3920, Monday-Friday; 9am – 5pm CT.

How do I qualify for HOV discounts?

Click here for detailed information on HOV Discount Qualifications and Activation

You will qualify for an HOV toll discount on NTE TEXpress Lanes as long as:

  • You have at least two people in the vehicle, such as a driver and a passenger (motorcycles do not require a passenger).
  • You have a valid TollTag, TxTag or EZ TAG account in good standing (i.e. cannot fall into a negative balance)
  • Your Tag is properly mounted on your vehicle’s windshield—including motorcycles—for our scanners to read them.
  • Your trip is during weekday rush-hour periods, Monday through Friday from 6:30 a.m. to 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. 
  • You use the GoCarma app technology
    • The Regional Transportation Council set a policy to move to more advanced technology to verify HOV status and replace manual enforcement. One smartphone in each registered vehicle is required through the GoCarma technology selected to meet the RTC’s policy.
    • The GoCarma app is an independent platform developed by Carma Technologies Corporation through a contract with the North Central Council of Governments (NCTCOG)

How much will tolls cost?

During the first six months following the opening of the North Tarrant Express project in October 2014, prices on the NTE TEXpress Lanes were fixed and did not make use of the real-time price increases and decreases. Rather, our pricing was scheduled higher during peak hours and lower during non-peak hours. This essentially simulated the demand-based tolling policies as we developed final pricing for the real-time, demand-based phase of our operations. After that six-month evaluation period, which occurred on April 2, 2015, new tolling policies were implemented in which the price changes based on a number of factors, including real-time congestion levels in each segment and/or the time of day.

Now that the NTE TEXpress Lanes have entered into the dynamic pricing phase, average toll prices may range from 10 cents to 25 cents per mile during lighter traffic, and 45 cents to 75 cents during rush hour. In the event that the average speed on the NTE TEXpress Lanes drops below 50 mph and starts to deteriorate, the toll rate will rise in order to maintain an average 50 mph trip in each segment of the corridor (the NTE TEXpress Lanes are comprised of two toll segments).

Applicable prices will depend on:

Traffic conditions as they change during the day (for instance, there will be higher toll rates during periods of higher congestion to maintain the 50 mph traffic speed)

  • Shape and size of vehicle
  • Number of passengers in the vehicle. Under the current policy, a minimum of two passengers (including the driver) are considered HOV (motorocycles do not need a passenger) and must meet the requirements for HOV Discount Qualifications and Activation. HOV users must have a windshield transponder (TxTAG, TollTag or EZ TAG) to receive the HOV discount.

How many toll segments do the NTE TEXpress Lanes have?

The NTE TEXpress Lanes will have a total of four toll segments once the I-35W extension is completed.

NTE TEXpress Lanes on Northeast Loop 820 and Airport Freeway are comprised of two separate toll segments. Toll Segment 1 begins at I-35W and ends at the Northeast Loop / Airport Freeway interchange, near North East Mall. Toll Segment 2 begins at the Northeast Loop / Airport Freeway interchange and ends at Industrial Boulevard. Two NTE TEXpress Lanes toll segments are on the I-35W extension. Toll Segment 3, which will open in 2018, runs from I-30 to Northeast Loop 820. Toll Segment 4, opening in two sections beginning in summer 2017, starts at Northeast Loop 820 and ends just north of US 287.

Once you enter a toll segment, you are charged for that segment. If you decide to continue to the next toll segment, you will see a pricing sign for that second segment—well in advance—to help you determine whether to continue your trip on the TEXpress Lanes or exit them. Once you enter the second tolling segment, you will be charged for that additional segment (charges for both segments will appear on your billing statement). Click here for a map that features all of the toll gantries for the NTE TEXpress Lanes.

Speed Limits

What is the speed limit on the NTE TEXpress Lanes?

The speed limit on the NTE TEXpress Lanes is 75 mph, whereas the speed limit on the adjacent general highway lanes is 65 mph. During peak travel times, congestion-management pricing aims to keep the NTE TEXpress Lanes flowing at a minimum of 50 mph.

Tolls, Pricing and Financing

What happens with the tolls when there is an accident?

Accidents are an unfortunate common occurrence on all highways. The operator of North Tarrant Express and LBJ Express always strives to clear an accident as soon as possible, even beyond the contractual requirements of the Texas Department of Transportation. In those accident situations, when there are unusual delays in the non-tolled lanes, the TEXpress Lanes tolls may proactively increase to ensure a continuous flow of traffic. This is done to avoid sudden surges in traffic that could stop the continuous movement at the exits and block the lanes that users are paying for. However, depending on the circumstances and magnitude of the accident, the management team in the Traffic Control Center will assess each situation on a case-by-case basis to determine the safest way to proceed.

How much will tolls cost?

During the first six months following the opening of the North Tarrant Express project in October 2014, prices on the NTE TEXpress Lanes were fixed and did not make use of the real-time price increases and decreases. Rather, our pricing was scheduled higher during peak hours and lower during non-peak hours. This essentially simulated the demand-based tolling policies as we developed final pricing for the real-time, demand-based phase of our operations. After that six-month evaluation period, which occurred on April 2, 2015, new tolling policies were implemented in which the price changes based on a number of factors, including real-time congestion levels in each segment and/or the time of day.

Now that the NTE TEXpress Lanes have entered into the dynamic pricing phase, average toll prices may range from 15 cents to 35 cents per mile during lighter traffic, and 45 cents to 90 cents during rush hour.  In the event that the average speed on the NTE TEXpress Lanes drops below 50 mph and starts to deteriorate, the toll rate will rise in order to maintain an average 50 mph trip in each segment of the corridor (the NTE TEXpress Lanes are comprised of two toll segments).

Applicable prices will depend on:

Traffic conditions as they change during the day (for instance, there will be higher toll rates during periods of higher congestion to maintain the 50 mph traffic speed)

  • Shape and size of vehicle
  • Number of passengers in the vehicle. Under the current policy, a minimum of two passengers (including the driver) are considered HOV and pay half-price during peak travel periods if they enroll and activate their HOV status (discount) via the Drive On TEXpress app or web app. Enforcement officers will monitor HOV usage. HOV users must have a windshield transponder (TxTAG, TollTag or EZ TAG) to receive the HOV discount.

Why are my tax dollars going to toll roads?

The Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) receives its funding from taxpayers, through taxes on gasoline and bond money that leverage those gas tax dollars. Over the past few years, gas tax revenue has decreased due to improved fuel efficiency in automobiles and motorists driving less frequently for a variety of reasons. The gas tax rate per gallon has not increased for nearly 20 years and does not fluctuate with the unpredictable price of gas.

The North Central Texas Council of Governments’ Regional Transportation Council (RTC) determines the prioritization and funding of transportation projects in North Texas. In our growing North Texas region, transportation needs are significantly greater than the available gas-tax dollars. Simply put, the sole source of revenue to pay for transportation projects in Texas has decreased, while both the population and need for improved roadways have increased.

In response, RTC developed the region’s managed toll lane policy. The region expects NTEMP to maintain a reliable level of service for motorists traveling at 50 mph. Because having fewer cars on the roadway improves mobility throughout the project corridor, the region also has developed a discount for mass transit and peak period carpoolers as an incentive.

Even with the addition of the new TEXpress Lanes, drivers will continue to have the choice to drive at no cost on the completely rebuilt main lanes and continuous frontage roads.

Can NTE Mobility Partners charge any price it wants?

No. Tolling policies are set by the Regional Transportation Council (RTC), a standing committee of the North Central Texas Council of Governments. The managed lanes policy for the TEXpress Lanes currently in use by the RTC can be viewed here: North Texas Council Managed Lanes Policy.

Toll rates vary and are unique to the region where the roadway exists, but they are always capped by state and federal authorities. A clearly defined tolling regulation and toll setting is imperative, given the importance of revenue and traffic forecasting to the development of toll projects. (Texas Association of Business; “P3 Roadways; Public-Private Partnerships that Work”)

NTE Mobility Partners (NTEMP) is required to increase the price of the tolls every 5 minutes when traffic reaches a maximum car-per-lane threshold or the speed drops below 50 miles per hour for a 15-minute period. NTEMP is charged a penalty under its Comprehensive Development Agreement with the Texas Department of Transportation for not meeting that performance requirement. Those penalties increase as the speed continues to drop.

As a private company, NTEMP has an interest in: 1) providing TEXpress Lanes that drivers want to use, and 2) providing that convenience at a price that drivers are willing to pay to avoid heavy traffic congestion.

Is there a cap on the tolls?

The Base Toll Rate Cap is 90 cents a mile for every toll segment in each direction (the NTE TEXpress Lanes have two toll segments). This is adjusted each year by a percentage equal to the previous year’s Consumer Price Index.

Congestion-management pricing for the NTE TEXpress Lanes was implemented on April 2, 2015, and tolls are now raised or lowered based on traffic demand and to keep traffic moving in accordance with a pre-defined mechanism approved by the Regional Transportation Council (RTC) and TxDOT.

Employment Opportunities

How do I find out about job opportunities on the NTE project?

We encourage you to visit the “About the NTE” section of our project website and click on “Job Opportunities,” where we post and update job listings and provide specific information on how to apply for a position.

I have my own business and would like to be considered as a contractor or vendor on the project. Who do I contact?

We encourage all interested parties to register their companies and their credentials for consideration in our Registered Vendor Database by visiting the “About the NTE” section of our project website and clicking on “Bid Opportunities.” We regularly post and update bid opportunities.

What are the opportunities for Disadvantaged Business Enterprises (DBEs) on the NTE project?

The North Tarrant Express has a DBE participation goal based on its Comprehensive Development Agreement with TxDOT. For more information on DBE requirements, please visit the “About the NTE” section of our project website and click on “Bid Opportunities.” We encourage DBE firms to register on our Registered Vendor Database.

Timeline/Construction Phasing

What is the expected timeline of the NTE project?

Construction on the North Tarrant Express began in October 2010. The project opened on Oct. 4, 2014, approximately nine months ahead of schedule. The extension of NTE includes I-35W, from downtown Fort Worth to US 287, which will open in two phases. Phase 1, which begins at the I-35W / 820 interchange and extends to US 287 opened in July 2017Phase 2, which runs from downtown Fort Worth to the I-35W / 820 interchange is expected to open in 2018.

Our plan is to prioritize each individual phase of the I-35W extension to open as soon as possible, so that we can deliver a new transportation network, relieving existing congestion and improving safety and air quality.

What precautions will be taken to minimize traffic delays?

To guarantee the safety of the public, we have carefully and thoughtfully developed a construction staging and traffic management design to provide for the safe and steady flow of traffic through the project area.

Our traffic control plans also incorporate traffic control devices to route traffic safely and at a controlled speed around construction areas. The project is in close coordination with traffic planners for all the cities in the area to ensure nearby traffic signals are timed to assist motorists in the construction area. This will keep drivers safe and reduce the impact of traffic on residents and businesses located near the project area.

Staying Connected

How can I get more information about the I-35W project?

There are many different ways to get information about the project:

  • Visit the project website regularly for construction updates
  • Subscribe for regular project updates and traffic alerts (visit the project website and click on “Get E-alerts”)
  • Call our toll-free information hotline at 1-888-NTE-2015 (1-888-683-2015)
  • Schedule a speaker for your business group, civic group or neighborhood association

How do I communicate comments or concerns about the project?

We invite your feedback on this important project. Please visit our Inquiries and Feedback page to send us any questions or comments. You can also submit questions or comments at any time during the project, either in person, by phone or mail to:

NTE Mobility Partners
8713 Airport Freeway, Suite 100
North Richland Hills, Texas 76180
1-888-NTE-2015

Economic Impact

What is the economic impact of the NTE project?

The NTE Mobility Partners consortium has a long-term commitment to the state of Texas and is already employing more than 2,000 Texans. There are more than 160 North Texas and statewide companies and their employees working on the project, including 150 Disadvantaged Business Enterprises (DBEs).

NTE 35W Project Overview

What is the scope of the North Tarrant Express/I-35W project?

This 10.2-mile project has already rebuilt the I-35W corridor in Fort Worth from downtown/I-30 to US 287 in Northeast Tarrant County. Construction will continue on the 6.7-mile, 35W Segment 3C, from US 287 to Eagle Parkway. Improvements to be made as part of this project include rebuilding the general purpose/main lanes, improving/expanding the frontage lanes, and adding four tolled managed lanes.

What are the goals of the NTE project?

This project will provide relief from traffic congestion and bottlenecks along one of the most critical — and highly congested — highway corridors in the Dallas-Fort Worth region. These improvements will enhance the safety and reliability of this highway system and also provide drivers with more control over their daily commutes.

Who is the developer of the NTE project?

NTE Mobility Partners Segments 3 designed, built, financed and is now operating and maintaining the southern segment (I-30 through the I-820 interchange). The construction of Segment 3C, from US 287 to Eagle Parkway, will begin in 2020. This partnership involves the Texas Department of Transportation and the City of Fort Worth. NTE Mobility Partners represents a consortium of companies, including Cintra US, a world leader in private-sector development of transportation infrastructure; Meridiam Infrastructure, a global public-private partnership investor/developer of private facilities and Ferrovial Agroman US/Webber LLC, a leading Texas construction company.

The Texas Department of Transportation financed and built the northern segment from I-820 to US 287 which is now open. Since opening, NTEMPS3, has taken over the operations and maintenance along with the rest of the NTE I-35W project.

Who owns the NTE project?

The State of Texas is the project’s owner. NTE Mobility Partners has entered into a lease agreement with the state to improve and expand the NTE, as well as operate and maintain it according to rigorous standards set by the state. Once the lease ends, TxDOT will resume the operation and maintenance of the roadway.

Timeline/Construction Phasing

What is the expected timeline of the NTE project?

Construction began on the northern segment (north of I-820) in April 2013, it opened in December 2016.

Construction began on the southern segment (south of I-820) in fall 2014, it is now open as of July 2018.

Will all of the 6.7-mile, Segment 3C, be under construction at the same time?

Yes. In order for us to meet the contracted project deadline, there will be construction along the entire corridor.

Our commitment is to ensure as minimal an impact on traffic operations as possible and to minimize disruptions to businesses and residents along the corridor.

What precautions will be taken to minimize traffic delays?

To guarantee the safety of the public, we have carefully and thoughtfully developed a construction staging and traffic management design to provide to provide for the safe and steady flow of traffic through the project area.

Our traffic control plans also incorporate traffic control devices to route traffic safely and at a controlled speed around construction areas. The project is in close coordination with traffic planners for all the cities in the area to ensure nearby traffic signals are timed to assist motorists in the construction area. This will keep drivers safe and reduce the impact of traffic on residents and businesses located near the project area.

TEXpress Lanes

What are TEXpress Lanes?

TEXpress Lanes are tolled lanes built within a highway corridor that use dynamic, congestion-management pricing to provide extra capacity, efficiently handle more traffic volume, and maintain a minimum 50 mph rate of travel.

How are highways with TEXpress Lanes different than toll roads?

A toll road, like the Dallas North Tollway (DNT) or the President George Bush Turnpike (PGBT), charges a fixed or scheduled rate for the use of the road. Additionally, toll roads do not generally predict travel times or ensure that traffic will keep moving as do the TEXpress Lanes.

TEXpress Lanes are designated express lanes within highway corridors with prices that fluctuate based on supply and demand to prevent congestion, and provide a minimum rate of speed of 50 mph.

Equipment monitoring real-time traffic conditions will periodically adjust the prices throughout the day based upon the average speed and number of drivers who want to use the TEXpress Lanes. Prices may go up or down, depending upon the amount of traffic and the time of day, but customers are notified of the price they will pay prior to entering any segment of the TEXpress Lanes.

Prices will be lower during non-peak driving times. The variable pricing ensures you a predictable, higher-speed commute.

Will I have to pay a toll to drive on the North Tarrant Express or other highways with TEXpress Lanes?

No. You may choose to drive on the reconstructed general highway lanes at no cost or, depending on traffic conditions, your schedule, and your budget, you can choose to take the adjacent tolled TEXpress Lanes. The TEXpress Lanes offer a choice to drivers.

Where are TEXpress Lanes being utilized in the Dallas-Fort Worth area?

Currently, TEXpress Lanes are being constructed on four major Dallas/Fort Worth corridors in addition to the North Tarrant Express and the I-35W project:

  • North Tarrant Express (I-820, SH 121/183)
  • LBJ Express (I-635)
  • SH-121
  • SH-114
  • I-35E
  • Loop 12
  • I-30
  • SH-183
  • I-35W

Who can use the TEXpress Lanes?

Anyone can use TEXpress Lanes, including local drivers, commuters and out-of-town travelers. Drivers can use any Texas toll tag (TxDOT’s TxTag, NTTA’s TollTag, or HCTRA’s EZPass) or, alternately, pay by mail for an additional surcharge. In addition, Oklahoma’s PIKEPASS can now be used on the TEXpress Lanes.

How will I know what the current toll prices are so I can decide whether to use the TEXpress Lanes?

Current prices are clearly displayed on signs in advance of each segment entry point. You will see separate rates for both pre-registered HOV 2+ users and single occupancy vehicles on all signs.

Economic Impact

What is the economic impact of the NTE project?

The NTE Mobility Partners consortium has a long-term commitment to the state of Texas. On the North Tarrant Express project along I-820 and Airport Freeway, the project employed more than 2,000 Texans. Additionally, there were more than 100 North Texas and statewide companies and their employees working on the project, including 90 Disadvantaged Business Enterprises (DBEs). Many of these employees and contractors have now moved over to the I-35W project.

Employment Opportunities

How do I find out about job opportunities on the NTE project?

We encourage you to visit the “About the NTE” section of our web site and click on “Job Opportunities,” where we post and update job listings and provide specific information on how to apply for a position.

I have my own business and would liike to be considered as a contractor or vendor on the project. Who do I contact?

We encourage all interested parties to register their companies and their credentials for consideration in our Registered Vendor Database by visiting the “About the NTE” section of our web site and clicking on “Bid Opportunities.” We regularly post and update bid opportunities.

What are the opportunities for Disadvantaged Business Enterprises (DBEs) on the NTE project?

The North Tarrant Express has a DBE participation goal based on its Comprehensive Development Agreement with TxDOT. For more information on DBE requirements, please visit the “About the NTE” section of our web site and click on “Bid Opportunities.” We encourage DBE firms to register on our Registered Vendor Database.

Staying Connected

How can I get more information about the project?

There are many different ways to get information about the project:

  • Visit the project web site regularly for updates
  • Subscribe for regular project updates and traffic alerts (visit the web site and click on “Get E-alerts”)
  • Call our toll-free information hotline at 1-888-NTE-2015 (1-888-683-2015)
  • Visit our Information Center, located at 8713 Airport Freeway, Suite 100, in North Richland Hills (open Monday through Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m.)
  • Schedule a speaker for your business group, civic group or neighborhood association.

How do I communicate comments or concerns about the project?

We invite your feedback on this important project. Please visit our project web site and click on “Contact Us” to submit any questions or comments. You can also submit comments or questions at any time during the project, either in person, by phone or US mail to:

NTE Mobility Partners
8713 Airport Freeway, Suite 100
North Richland Hills, TX 76180
Phone: 888-NTE-2015